JOM – Volume 29, Number 3 – Abstracts

 

The Role of Lithium in Neurological Health and Disease

Laurie Mischley, ND, MPH, PhD(c)

Bastyr University Research Institute, Clinical Research Assistant Professor, 14500 Juanita Dr. NE, Kenmore, WA 98028. Email: lmischley@bastyr.edu
PhD Candidate, University of Washington School of Public Health, Department of Nutritional Sciences

Abstract Nutrition is the study of the human dependence on our environment. Lithium (Li) is found in all human cells and the notion that it is essential for physiologic function is well supported by the literature, although a syndrome associated with lithium deficiency has yet to be formally described. A literature review was conducted to identify all publications describing Li metabolism, physiologic roles, and nutrient-nutrient interactions. The evidence for clinical manifestations of deficiency, such as impulse control disorders, aggression, depression, and poor mood, is reviewed, as is the evidence for the notion that Li deficiency may increase risk of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions via enhanced neuronal hyperexcitability and impaired autophagy. Li deficiency is an established, but poorly described, phenomenon that appears to be associated with impaired central nervous system function, at least on a community level. Whether fortification efforts would improve individual or public health cannot be determined without additional research.

 

 

Sedation, Relaxation, and Regulation: The Clinical Application of Gamma-aminobutyric acid, Niacin, and Melatonin for the Treatment of Insomnia

Jonathan E. Prousky, ND, MSc

Chief Naturopathic Medical Officer, Professor, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, 1255 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario, M2K 1E2 email: jprousky@ccnm.edu; website: www.jonathanprouskynd.com
Editor, Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, email: editor@orthomed.org

Abstract
Insomnia is a common problem seen in clinical practice. It has been defined as unsatisfactory sleep that impacts daily functioning, and for diagnostic purposes can be separated into acute insomnia (i.e., less than 30 days), or chronic insomnia (i.e., greater than or equal to 30 days). The majority of insomnia cases are associated with other medical conditions, giving rise to a more appropriate diagnosis of “comorbid insomnia.” The work-up of chronic insomnia is described. Improving sleep habits should be the foundation of a program designed to correct insomnia, especially if it is considered chronic. The author has been experimenting clinically with a variety of orthomolecular substances for over 15 years, and has found a specific combination of three orthomolecules to be particularly effective for many cases of acute or chronic insomnia. This approach is called, “SRR,” which refers to the use of gamma-aminobutyric acid, niacin, and prolonged-release melatonin to promote sedation, relaxation, and regulation, respectively. A brief description of each of these orthomolecules is included, as well as appropriate prescribing information. Other clinical considerations are described to assist clinicians in managing insomnia.

 

 

Stress-Induced Brain Atrophy:
 A Role for Orthomolecular Medicine

Benjamin I. Brown, ND

The UK College of Nutritional Health (BCNH), London, England, email address: BenBrown@bcnh.co.uk

Abstract Brain structure can be shaped and remodeled by several important environmental factors throughout an individual’s life course, with nutrition and chronic stress two of the most established environmental factors. Stress-induced atrophy in key brain regions is thought to play a central role in the development of mental health disorders including depression, psychosis, and cognitive decline. Conversely, nutrients, in particular the omega-3 fatty acids and homocysteine-lowering B vitamins, can improve mental health and are potent modulators of brain structure with evidence suggesting that personalized nutritional interventions may increase neurogenesis, restore brain structure and protect the brain from the damaging effects of stress. Furthermore, nutritional interventions may augment and improve the potential for behavioral therapies and lifestyle changes to reverse brain atrophy and, in turn, improve mental and physical wellbeing.

 

 

The Treatment of Alcoholism with Vitamin B3

Jonathan E. Prousky, ND, MSc

Chief Naturopathic Medical Officer, Professor, Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, 1255 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario, M2K 1E2 email: jprousky@ccnm.edu; website: www.jonathanprouskynd.com
Editor, Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, email: editor@orthomed.org

Abstract The consequences of excessive and prolonged use of alcohol leads to mild-to-severe forms of pellagra (i.e., some combination of diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia, and possibly death). The author describes the work of many notable individuals who reported on the clinical effectiveness of vitamin B3 treatment for compulsive drinking behaviour, alcohol withdrawal delirium, and for improving sobriety. There is definitely a significant therapeutic role that vitamin B3 could play (mostly, niacin) if it was part of the mainstream approach to treating alcoholism and its related complications.

2014-11-02T20:04:08+00:00